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Name and Title
Jessica Koper
Partner
Associate
Year of Call

2014

Memberships
Publications
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2019-05-14
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2019-03-01
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2019-02-01
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2018-10-01
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2018-09-01
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Jessica Koper Head ShotCanadian jurisdictions have taken a proactive approach to transgender rights in recent years, Windsor employment lawyer Jessica Koper tells AdvocateDaily.com.

Koper, an associate with Shibley Righton LLP, says the federal government recently made up lost ground on most provinces when Parliament passed Bill C-16, which added the terms “gender identity” and “gender expression” to the list of prohibited grounds of discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA).

The language of the law mirrored provisions added to Ontario's Human Rights Code (HRC) as far back as 2012, she explains. In addition to the CHRA changes, the federal bill also amended the Criminal Code to ensure crimes motivated by a victim's gender identity or gender expression qualify as hate crimes.

“There has been a big movement in terms of transgender rights and protections, and I would describe the changes as more proactive than reactive,” Koper says. “There haven’t been many lawsuits in this area, but there has been a great deal of awareness raised along with policy changes.”

The CHRA first passed in 1977 under then-prime minister Pierre Trudeau's government, protecting Canadians from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Canada later became one of the first countries in the world to legalize same-sex marriage in 2005 when the Civil Marriage Act passed both houses of Parliament during the government led by former prime minister Paul Martin.

This is an excerpt from an article that appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the rest of the story.

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2018-08-02
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2018-06-09
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Jessica KoperEmployers should prepare themselves for a spike in accommodation requests from employees with elderly family members due to Canada’s aging population, Windsor employment lawyer Jessica Koper tells AdvocateDaily.com.

Employers have a duty to accommodate under the Ontario’s Human Rights Code (HRC), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of family status, and Koper, associate with Shibley Righton LLP, explains that family status requests traditionally tended to relate to the care of children. However, that is changing.  

“Given today’s society and the growing elderly population, there are now many more individuals who are responsible for caring for their elderly parents than there used to be,” she says.

“And that number will only grow,” Koper adds.

This is an excerpt from an article that appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the rest of the story.

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2018-05-29
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2018-05-08
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2018-04-07
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2018-03-06
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2018-02-05
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2018-01-04
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Employers offering to augment parental leave benefits should ensure their policies are up-to-date now that the federal government has announced an extended leave option of 18 months, says Windsor employment and education lawyer Jessica Koper.

If companies or organizations have policies stating they will top-up employment insurance benefits during parental leave for employees, they should determine whether those plans would continue for the entire period if parents choose to take the time off, says Koper, associate with Shibley Righton LLP.

“If they are caught in a policy they haven’t reviewed, it could mean they have to top up an employee for a longer period or for a greater amount than they may have intended,” Koper tells AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the complete story

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2017-11-09
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2017-10-01
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2017-09-01
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Requests to have service dogs in schools are becoming increasingly challenging and complex, says Windsor education lawyer Jessica Koper.

While in an employment context, employers have the right to choose the type of accommodation when notified of an employee’s disability, the situation becomes a little murky in a school setting, says Koper, an associate with Shibley Righton LLP.

“It is much more complex when it’s a request for a psychological or mental disability, such as anxiety, as opposed to an accommodation request for a physical disability, such as a guide dog,” she says.

This article appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.  Please click here to read the complete story.

Date_Published
2016-10-14
Description

An Ontario Divisional Court has upheld a school board decision to close Niagara-on-the-Lake’s last elementary school in a ruling that acknowledges how difficult and heart wrenching such closures can be for communities, says education lawyer Sheila MacKinnon, a partner with Shibley Righton LLP.

Citizens for Accountable and Responsible Education Niagara Inc. v. District School Board of Niagara, 2015 ONSC 2058 (CanLII) saw a group of parents challenge the District School Board of Niagara decision to close Parliament Oak School (POS) due to decreased enrollment.

The school board was represented by Shibley Righton lawyers Paul Howard and Jessica Koper.

Please click here for the fill story

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2015-06-29
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2015-06-16
Experience
More About
BIO

Jessica is a Litigation Associate in the Windsor office of the firm, and a member of our Civil Litigation, Education & Public Law, and Employment & Labour Law practice groups. Jessica articled with the firm and was called to the Ontario Bar in 2014. In her practice, Jessica has represented clients before various courts and tribunals across Ontario, including the Superior Court of Justice – General Division, Small Claims Court and Divisional Court, and the Human Rights Tribunal, Child and Family Services Review Board, Landlord and Tenant Tribunal and the Ontario Labor Relations Board.

Jessica obtained her law degree from the University of Windsor, where she was a recipient of the Social Justice Fellowship Award. Following her first year, Jessica secured a placement as a legal intern with the Bureau of Research at the Parliament of the Republic of Poland and its Committee for European Affairs, based in the nation’s capital, Warsaw.

Prior to attending law school, Jessica obtained her Bachelor of Arts (Double Honours) in Criminology and Law & Society from York University. Jessica subsequently completed a post-graduate certificate in Fraud Investigations and Forensic Accounting, and was then employed as a fraud investigator in corporate services for one of Canada’s leading investigation firms, Xpera (formerly King-Reed & Associates), in Toronto.

Jessica remains active with the Windsor Law community, serving as a coach for the annual Canadian Corporate Securities Moot competition and as a sessional instructor for the course, Advocacy Before Administrative Tribunals.

Fluent in three languages, Jessica can communicate in French, Polish, and English. In her spare time, Jessica enjoys staying active, cooking, playing the piano (completed all levels with the Royal Conservatory of Music), and travelling (having explored various countries in Eastern and Central Europe, the Middle East, Southeast Asia and Central America). Jessica also served as Junior Director of the Essex Law Association for 2016-2017.

Contact Information

T: 519.967.3789
F: 519.969.8045
E: jessica.koper@shibleyrighton.com

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Education

University of Windsor, J.D., 2013
York University, B.A. (Hons), 2008

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