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Immigration Law

Due to the trans-global nature of business today, the mobility of personnel can be critical to a company. At Shibley Righton LLP, we work with our clients in assessing their needs and assisting them in relocating foreign workers, such as senior managers, individuals with specialized skills, and other professionals. We routinely assist employers with Labour Market Opinions and, where plausible, applications exempt from the requirements such as intra-company transferees and other treaty exempt individuals. We further assist the families of foreign workers with spousal work permits, visitor records or study permits. In addition, we also assist individuals who may face impediments to entering or remaining in Canada. We help individuals to both obtain and retain permanent residency whether it be by applying for permanent residence or retaining permanent residence. We offer personalized service, recognizing that the status of individuals and their families is fundamental to their security.

Shibley Righton LLP represents multi-national corporations, private companies and individuals from countries throughout the world. Andrea White handles the specialized needs of our immigration clients.

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Laura Stairs Head ShotCHARLOTTETOWN — Prince Edward Island is scrapping a controversial business immigration program, which prompted federal investigations alleging hundreds of applicants never settled on the Island.

The provincial government said Wednesday it will no longer accept applications from immigrants looking to set up a business on the Island in the entrepreneur stream of the Provincial Nominee Program.

The immigration program has faced criticism for granting permanent residency status — a coveted step towards full citizenship — before businesses were set up and people actually moved to P.E.I.

Under the program, the applicants provide the Island government with a $200,000 refundable deposit and commit to invest $150,000 and manage a firm.

This is an excerpt from an article that appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the rest of the story.

Date_Published
2018-09-14
Description

Laura Stairs Head ShotA lawsuit filed by eight Filipino migrant workers against a job recruiter and a farm in Ontario casts light on how easy it is for vulnerable people to be tricked into paying for jobs and denied the protections provided by Canadian law, says Windsor, Ont., corporate and immigration lawyer  Laura Stairs.

The Toronto Star reports eight seasonal agricultural workers are suing a Toronto-based company and a farm in East Gwillimbury, Ont., alleging they were charged thousands of dollars in fees for legal advice and Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIA), which are prerequisites for obtaining most work permits, before being sent to work at the farm. In small claims court, the workers — who say they never received the work permits and admit they worked illegally on visitor visas — are seeking to have the money they paid refunded.

Stairs, an associate with Shibley Righton LLP, says it is important for all foreign workers to know that it is employers’ responsibility to conduct and pay for LMIA applications. These documents are required by the Canadian government to prove there is a need to bring in a foreign worker because there is no Canadian to do the job and employers are not permitted to pass these costs on to workers, she says.

This is an excerpt from an article that appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the rest of the story.

Date_Published
2018-06-20
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Laura Stairs Head ShotCommunity has always been important to Windsor corporate and immigration lawyer Laura Stairs.

An associate with Shibley Righton LLP, Stairs studied global development at Queen’s University and worked for the the Kingston Roundtable on Poverty Reduction while she lived in the city.

“I was very interested in local issues and community activism, and this was a great way to get involved and make a difference,” Stairs tells AdvocateDaily.com.

It was during that time that she first seriously considered the possibility of a legal career after working closely with a lawyer on the board of the roundtable

“I found the skills she had were particularly helpful in the work we were doing, which got me thinking that law was something I could do to have a positive impact on the community,” Stairs says.   

During a decorated spell at the University of Windsor’s law school, she received the Transnational Law and Justice Network Fellowship, allowing her to complete an extensive research project for Amnesty International focused on international criminal law, and was also awarded the Stitt Feld Handy Social Justice Fellowship, which resulted in a 10-week internship at the Legal Resources Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa.

This is an excerpt from an article that appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the rest of the story.

Date_Published
2018-06-04

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