Publications

The firm publishes specialized materials for the use of clients and others with an interest in particular areas of law. Please feel free to read those materials, grouped in the area on the right. However, before you do please read and make sure you understand our Terms of Use and the copyright restrictions for this site.

RSS
Search
Description

Patrick GrecoToronto condominium lawyer Patrick Greco likes to feel involved in his clients’ communities.

Greco, a partner with Shibley Righton LLP, tells AdvocateDaily.com that condo law by its nature is a “very human area” of practice.

“I really like that aspect of it — getting to interact with owners, board members, and property managers,” he says. “I like to think of myself as a partner in their communities — someone who knows the owners and the board, and is just a call away when any of them needs help.

“I’m part of their team,” adds Greco, who tries to take a friendly and humorous approach to all of his dealings with clients.

“There’s already enough stress in the condo world, and if you can’t laugh, then you’d cry,” he says.

And Greco gets plenty of opportunities to develop those relationships since many of his evenings are spent attending or chairing meetings of unit owners or condo corporation boards, while his days are frequently filled with providing quick-turnaround answers to queries and concerns coming in from clients.

When he was a law student, Greco might not have recognized his current practice. He graduated around the same time as Ontario’s Condominium Act came into force, revolutionizing the regulation of condos in the province.

“It wasn’t something I had heard much about,” he explains.

This is an excerpt from an article that appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the rest of the story.

Date_Published
2019-02-08
Description

Laura Stairs Head ShotMaking a bequest to charity can create a meaningful legacy, but there are potential pitfalls that a good lawyer can help you avoid, Windsor trusts and estates lawyer Laura Stairs tells AdvocateDaily.com.

Generosity in death is something expressed by people from all walks of life, says Stairs, an associate at Shibley Righton LLP.

“While testators are still living, they might be concerned about resources, or perhaps it’s prohibitive to give to charity while they’re retired and don’t know how much money they’re going to need,” she says. “But upon death, you have an opportunity to give something back to an organization that matters to you.”

Stairs describes some common issues in charitable giving that require a lawyer’s help.

Attaching conditions. She says clients frequently want to put conditions on their charitable bequests. They may have volunteered or worked for an organization doing specific projects, so they allocate their gift on the basis of that work continuing, she says.

“When conditions like that are put on a gift it creates the risk of the charity not being able to accept it if they’re unable to meet that condition, for example, if that project is no longer in operation,” Stairs says.  

A lawyer can add language to the will to reflect your wish for the gift to go to a specific project, but if for some reason this condition cannot be met, the charity’s board of directors can still accept it and make a determination as to how to spend it, she says.

This is an excerpt from an article that appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the rest of the story.

Date_Published
2019-02-04
Description

Jonathan Miller HeadShotWhile more judges are assessing costs in cases where artificial intelligence (AI) could have reduced the number of billable hours, there are still a number of unanswered questions surrounding its use, says Toronto civil and commercial litigator Jonathan Miller.

“Judges are prepared to tell lawyers that AI could have been used in court preparation. They’re saying, ‘You shouldn’t be entitled to all the costs you incurred to do that research,’” Miller tells AdvocateDaily.com.

He says there are a number of online sources, such as CanLII, that help lawyers find and compile information, but there are also companies developing AI research to make searches more efficient. 

“In some cases, you can plug in a set of parameters, and it will look at case law and say, ‘Here’s your answer,’” says Miller, an associate with the Toronto office of Shibley Righton LLP.

He recently explored an AI program focusing on employment law, and while enticing, he says there are still many questions left unanswered about the new technology.

This is an excerpt from an article that appeared on AdvocateDaily.com.

Please click here to read the rest of the story.

 

Date_Published
2019-02-04
521 New Publication(s) found.
< Page of 174 >

Subscribe

eBulletin Subscribe to our eBulletin via email now  
RSS Feed Subscribe to our RSS Feed now